«

»

Showing Love For Wildlife Refuges Through Photography

After hearing about the armed standoff at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Steve Dimock’s first thought was, “Let’s introduce people to what a wildlife refuge is and what makes them special through photography.”

Dimock, a professional photographer and owner of an inn near Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, began posting a daily photo on his Facebook page of what wildlife refuges should be known for–the array of landscapes, animals, vegetation and cultural resources found on those lands and waters.

He was saddened to think many heard of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge–located in the high desert of southeastern Oregon at the northern edge of the Great Basin–because of the standoff. Their first experience with this place was not gazing upon the Steen Mountains, fishing at the Krumbo Reservoir or seeing meadows teeming with birds as they migrate up the Pacific Flyway. Instead, people were introduced to the refuge via scenes of an armed takeover, protests and destruction of natural and cultural resources.

The situation at Malheur NWR is not representative of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a world-class conservation network extending over more than 150 million acres that is the only federal public land system dedicated to wildlife conservation first. Wildlife refuges are also where millions of Americans go to enjoy outdoor recreation.

Photography is one of the “Big Six” wildlife-dependent recreational uses offered on most refuges, and wildlife photography is one of the fastest growing activities on national wildlife refuges.

Thanks to Steve Dimock for reminding us what spectacular places wildlife refuges are and how we can all benefit from them!

 

What the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge should be known for…History. There are some fabulous historical sites…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Thursday, January 7, 2016

What our Wildlife Refuges should be known for…Family time. This image of a mother Harbor Seal and her pup was made…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Saturday, January 9, 2016

What Oregon’s National Wildlife Refuges should be known for…Reflection. Taken at the Bandon Marsh NWR (part of the…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Friday, January 15, 2016

What our National Wildlife Refuges Should be known for…Cooperation. This Bald Eagle is sitting on a dike in the…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Thursday, January 28, 2016

What our National Wildlife Refuges should be known for…A place to meet new friends. Here we have a couple of young…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Monday, January 25, 2016

What our National Wildlife Refuge should be saved for… Future generations. This fawn is, at my best guess, no more…

Posted by Steve Dimock Photography on Saturday, January 16, 2016

View more at the Steve Dimock Photography page on Facebook.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.refugeassociation.org/2016/02/showing-love-for-wildlife-refuges-through-photography/

2 comments

  1. Steve Dimock says:

    Thank you for sharing my images and for all the work you do in support of the National Wildlife Refuges.

  2. Sandy Zelasko says:

    Way to go Steve Dimock! What a great way to feature wildlife in each refuge and include interesting facts about them. I liked your FB page and encourage others to do so too! And thanks to those employees and volunteers dedicated to making our National Wildlife Refuge System a real treasure.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>